Tailored Bath Design

         Chestnut Hill Bath Remodel

I often use the term “tailored” when describing some of the parts and process we use in kitchen and bath design.  Even though tailors have little to do with renovating, it is a good metaphor for the difference between a generic developer’s bath circa 1995, and a fully developed plan.

A fully developed, or “tailored plan” uses interior architecture as well as interior design to create a plan where the details have a multi-prong synergy.

  1. The first step is drawing an improved and maximized space that takes full advantage of the real estate available. The existing bath in this study only fit one sink and vanity because of an arbitrary installation of a large tub deck The new bath has his and hers vanities with a larger shower, and still fits a large tub for soaking.
  2. Designing details that create a safe and lasting design is often an unnoticed aspect of the big picture. The existing plan in our example did not have tempered glass (required by code) near the tub. An important safety factor near a slippery surface. The design should also account for small items such as running tile high enough in a shower if the client is extra tall so the walls plaster and paint don’t deteriorate at an accelerated pace.
  3. Where one design element starts and another begins is just as important. If you look at the marriage of the tile floor inlay, how the tile climbs to and above the shower threshold; as well as the continuity of the horizontal planes with tile and crown molding, they all work equally effective at the sink, in the shower and around the tub.

Contact us here for more details on our bath remodeling services!

Happy Tailoring!

                                                                                          

 

2017 Kitchen and Bath Trends

Every year the National Kitchen and Bath Association holds our annual trade show. I have been attending most years for the past quarter century to keep up on new building science, trends and innovation. The conference has become product centric in many ways and many reasons. First, the great recession led to publishers and show managers turning their focus to the deeper pockets of manufacturers, over designers’ education. Then, the publishers of home design content were lured (rightfully so) by the craving for design photos shown in places like Pinterest and Houzz. Because we don’t want to bore you with what we think is more important to our clients, design and business acumen, we gathered a few photos of some interesting insights.

First of note, we saw the growing choices in hardware finishes. Holy Cow, Rose gold plumbing fixtures? I personally wouldn’t buy that on an iPhone so I probably won’t be recommending it. And before you decide that black plumbing fixtures, think about how much soap spots will bother you in between cleaning.

Another strong theme throughout was natural wood. Rustic may be in for a while, but in a different and more modern way. Think about this walnut wood with rustic knots, in more tailored higher end woodwork.  It could work for traditional and contemporary styles. This is from our trade partner, Plato Woodwork

Making your cabinetry exactly what you want. Fully custom cabinetry offers interesting opportunities. We are often asked about ways to add and hide drying racks- we loved this! 

And what if you just want to smile every time you open the vanity drawer. Ok, maybe “interior painted pink” isn’t for you, but we thought it was a great way for the cabinet maker to show off their willingness to do whatever it takes. 

Another strong movement in design is patterned tile. We saw a lot of geometrics. Almost every tile manufacturer was showing off unique patterns and textures. 

Our design team will be having great fun with upcoming projects and all these new cool ideas. I hope you enjoyed the pics! Don’t worry; we attended many educational seminars on management and design. As well as presented two educational seminars to the industry to help them help their clients with more than product. Alexandra and Lisa presented a class on helping people improve their design to benefit the clients daily lifestyle (while making it beautiful), and I presented a class on how to provide clients with an accurate budget, without relying on change orders. 

If you would like to speak to our design team about incorporating these trends into your upcoming renovations, contact us here

Pros and Cons of Waterfall Edges

Waterfall edges on counter tops can be a great way to push a modern vibe. As long as you know what to expect, you won’t be disappointed.

The first thing you should be prepared for is the cost, because in some cases this look can more than double the price. The things that have an effect on price start with the seam. Where the vertical and horizontal edges meet, the material should be grain matched to keep the movement in the top contiguous. You can see in the photos that this is true for both pictures. The picture with the double thick top is in our showroom and the waterfall edge is on both sides of the counter. On the other end (not shown) the grain does not line up because the material was not long enough. In the “during construction” photo for this high-rise kitchen remodel in Boston, we were able to procure a “jumbo” slab for seamless top and matching grains. Also, there is a price difference on the thickness of the counter and if you have it doubled up, you can achieve a finished side on both ends of the counter. Make sure you ask about the edge and get a look at the lay-out before you make a final decision.

 

 

Because this look is popular, driven both by the push for modern design and the desire to have a statement piece- don’t just put this look into a kitchen because you want one. When we are asked about incorporating a waterfall edge in a design, we try to also show 2-3 other concepts with other monolithic ideas to resolve what really works in the space. A great looking kitchen is the sum of the parts and if this is forced into a space it really doesn’t fit, it can actually detract from the end result.

It isn’t just for stone or quartz, we used a great piece of walnut in one kitchen that gave an additional stool space around the corner and made for a nice warm transition to the family room!

Happy counters! Ray

A Very Thankful Kitchen Renovation

November is here and Thanksgiving is upon us. The Wiese Company would like to send a big Thank You to all the Veterans and their families. I know Veterans Day and Thanksgiving are two very different holidays, but this is a good time of year to be thankful to those neighbors and friends who volunteered and have made sacrifices to serve our country.

We get to know our delivery folks well because we see them almost daily at the showroom with a constant stream of kitchen and bath fixtures coming through. Our former Fed Ex driver, and Army Veteran, Matt Lizotte is a great hard working person who served 2 deployments in Afghanistan. One day Matt asked about cabinets and told me about his condo with the tired kitchen. I told Matt about the average cost of a kitchen renovation and saw the look of disbelief in his eyes. Matt said, well- Maybe next year.

Since the initial kitchen conversation, Matt and I have had dinner out together about once a month. I learned that Matt didn’t want a free kitchen, or a parade, or anything but a decent job and a friend who gets it. So The Wiese Team went to work! After receiving permission from our veteran, we measured up and our designers came up with a look (all of which was a surprise) and we went to work on delivering a special and complimentary new space. Many folks don’t know that leaving your military friends and family you were deployed with can leave such a void that many Veterans long to go back to those not so nice environments just to be with their people. It doesn’t take a free kitchen to help someone assimilate back to apple pie and ball game- just a “how is your day going” from time to time so they can feel like they are where they belong will help.

             

One more thing I am just as thankful for this November: the people I work with every day. They gave their time for free with enthusiasm. Our Painter Kevin Carlson, Plumber Dan Lannon, Electrician Steve Pacewicz also provided services at no cost and we received free materials from Taylor Forest Products and Showplace Wood. The Sherborn Elementary School “Pine Hill” 4th and 5th Grade Chorus donated $250 they raised for a Veteran Cause to build the flag. What a fantastic demonstration of a community showing their gratitude and support. Thank you ALL!

One last note: I know I have many Veteran clients we have done amazing renovations for over the years, congratulations on your success and your help with our firm’s success. Unfortunately I will not be able to make those projects pro bono :) . Happy Thanksgiving- Ray

Kitchen Organization

Want an Organized Kitchen?

Here are some tips and insight into kitchen organization that will hopefully be helpful. To go along with this handy set of tips are some photos to use as a guide to find your inner organizer. As a caveat to this blog, these photos belong to a kitchen we just remodeled in Newton for our bookkeeper, and as you may know, bookkeepers are supposed to be methodical and organized… or somewhat anal retentive, (sorry Lauri, but we share that trait)- so if you’re an artist, just wing it and throw some spices in the same drawer you put the Tupperware :)

1. Don’t fall for every cool thing you see. In our showroom, we actually have many of the “add on” items throughout our displays- however, unlike some showrooms, we display many of them to talk the pros… and cons of each item. The first photo is for the kitchen aid mixer. This kitchen belongs to a master cook- and she uses the mixer all the time, and OBVIOUSLY doesn’t want to see things like mixers on the counter top. This mixer lift keeps it out of the way and easy to access. Remember, I know most of you own a mixer- so be honest about how often that thing makes an appearance before you dedicate a space. If it’s less than twice a month- throw it in the pantry.


2. We all have spices, and some folks collect spices (remember to look at the expiration dates… they are on almost every one and they do expire). I am old school and love to cook, so the salt and pepper grinder never get put away. I find that almost anyone (even the best chefs) does not need more than one cabinet door near the cook and prep area for all the main spices. So before you think you have to have room for 300 bottles- take a mental inventory of everything you cooked in the last season and make room for it. If you have a friend that likes all the labels facing front- turn a couple of them around, shoot a photo and then write a blog post… Monday should be interesting!


3. Appliance garages are terrific and we have a lot of clients who are of the neat and tidy crowd, so before you just add one, find out how the doors open, if they can stay open without interfering with anything and if you really need one. I loved finding the food processor in this photo because I use mine about once a week and wish I had it in a more convenient location like this.


4. Drawer organizers are great. We recommend holding off on this item initially and using an inexpensive organizer until you are all moved in and satisfied you like where you have put the silverware and utensils… these can migrate a bit until you get in the groove of your new space. Once you have them though… I challenge you to open the drawer at random… as we did, and find everything looking so tidy… I mean really!!! Look at the knives, Lauri.

When you are designing your next kitchen… the most important thing is to work with a professional who thinks in advance about all the items you have and where it will work to have them.
Happy cooking!
RAY