2017 Kitchen and Bath Trends

Every year the National Kitchen and Bath Association holds our annual trade show. I have been attending most years for the past quarter century to keep up on new building science, trends and innovation. The conference has become product centric in many ways and many reasons. First, the great recession led to publishers and show managers turning their focus to the deeper pockets of manufacturers, over designers’ education. Then, the publishers of home design content were lured (rightfully so) by the craving for design photos shown in places like Pinterest and Houzz. Because we don’t want to bore you with what we think is more important to our clients, design and business acumen, we gathered a few photos of some interesting insights.

First of note, we saw the growing choices in hardware finishes. Holy Cow, Rose gold plumbing fixtures? I personally wouldn’t buy that on an iPhone so I probably won’t be recommending it. And before you decide that black plumbing fixtures, think about how much soap spots will bother you in between cleaning.

Another strong theme throughout was natural wood. Rustic may be in for a while, but in a different and more modern way. Think about this walnut wood with rustic knots, in more tailored higher end woodwork.  It could work for traditional and contemporary styles. This is from our trade partner, Plato Woodwork

Making your cabinetry exactly what you want. Fully custom cabinetry offers interesting opportunities. We are often asked about ways to add and hide drying racks- we loved this! 

And what if you just want to smile every time you open the vanity drawer. Ok, maybe “interior painted pink” isn’t for you, but we thought it was a great way for the cabinet maker to show off their willingness to do whatever it takes. 

Another strong movement in design is patterned tile. We saw a lot of geometrics. Almost every tile manufacturer was showing off unique patterns and textures. 

Our design team will be having great fun with upcoming projects and all these new cool ideas. I hope you enjoyed the pics! Don’t worry; we attended many educational seminars on management and design. As well as presented two educational seminars to the industry to help them help their clients with more than product. Alexandra and Lisa presented a class on helping people improve their design to benefit the clients daily lifestyle (while making it beautiful), and I presented a class on how to provide clients with an accurate budget, without relying on change orders. 

If you would like to speak to our design team about incorporating these trends into your upcoming renovations, contact us here

Finding the Right Flooring for You

In the Northeast, the most popular flooring we install is white oak planks. This type of floor has remained popular because it is durable, and has a lasting aesthetic that can survive trends by re-finishing.  Refinishing an oak floor completely can be done 3-8 times (depending on the experience of the refinisher) and each re-finishing has a lifespan of about 20 years.  Not a bad long-term investment!

There have been other wood species that are popular in our area, such as Brazilian cherry. It is warm and dark with more of a redder tone than walnut. My advice is to think about the whole house and overall architecture before making a selection since it is important to have consistency through the interior where you install wood. Plus, it will be part of the architectural tone of the interior for some time.

In one home we renovated in Dover, the owners had installed wide plank walnut throughout when the home was built. The New England neo/shingle style made this a perfect choice. The floors are a great timeless statement. These planks were about 6” wide, which I know many people do enjoy a wider floor.

If you are adding on and have a lot of good existing oak, one great idea you can use that will keep a good consistent flow is to use wider boards in the same wood for the new family room. Then re-finish the entire first floor at one time. This would keep a sense of cohesion while making one space feel more upscale/casual and all the floors would have a similar matching color and grain- you could even stain them to match. Keep in mind that the wider the board, the higher the cost and it is recommended for boards over 4” that the flooring be glued and nailed to avoid cupping.

Now a day, wall to wall carpet has become increasingly popular in Master suites.  I think this has a lot to do with creating a soft and warm surface when we swing our legs around the bed for those first morning steps.  Additionally, the bedroom is where a pattern on the floor can create great synergy with the design and add a layer of texture.

There is a common misconception that carpet is less expensive than wood, which isn’t always true. The first time I learned about fine carpeting was about 20 years ago. The client asked me if using carpet would save them money if they installed it in their master bedroom; I said sure! Off they went to a very nice and reputable dealer and selected a beautiful Tibetan Wool carpet that was approximately $30 per square foot installed. Don’t worry; a good wool carpet is available for about the same cost as wood flooring.

No matter what you want your floor to do, make sure it is part of the overall design discussion when you begin planning.

Happy renovating! – Ray

 

Ice Melt Alternatives

It’s that time of year again! For some of us, there are special challenges around keeping our entry safe for family, the delivery folks and guests.

If you have a nice flat walking path to a covered entry- all you need is a shovel and some ice melt. But wait! Before sprinkling anything down there are a few things you should look for.

Some ice melt products can be very harmful to certain surfaces or your pets. Concrete is especially susceptible to calcium damage if the concrete is new or the product is overused. Read the labels carefully and if you must put down salt, do it sparingly.

Last winter, I went to see a previous client in Weston about another renovation in the middle of February. They have a long sloped walk that leads to an entry that ends up collecting a lot of snow and drips. The sloped walk keeps water flowing when it melts and freezing on the path in the cold which makes this an ongoing maintenance issue, even with a mild winter.

If you have wood steps like mine, you know that a mild day of drizzle with below freezing temperatures overnight leaves a very slick surface. If you have a slope with an area of runoff that makes the ice difficult to keep up with, constant snow melt can damage the steps and be very time consuming to keep up with.

That Weston client had these rubber mats leading down the walk that were heated and were also very skid resistant. I decided to try them on for size in a very unusual lay-out as shown. Last year I had temporary pressure treated wood on there and didn’t mind throwing salt and sand on them. I couldn’t imagine salting the new Ipe walk, and I had to promise my wife that I would buy these mats if we went with wood over masonry so the morning walk to the bus wasn’t a daring act of balance.

A couple of quick notes:

1) What you see cost about $1k (my in-laws are worth it).

2) Most exterior outlets are 15 amps. Each 5’ section is 2.4 amps and each step is .7 amps.

I didn’t need a new circuit like my friend Bob in Weston but I did buy a remote so I wouldn’t have to go outside to turn them on. You could add an outlet with a timer switch if that works for you and only run them when you need them. In my test today, they warmed up in about 10 minutes while 25 degrees outside and the manufacturer says it melts 2” per hour.

Happy Winter! – Ray

Remodeling and Renovation Planning- Where to Start

When preparing for a large renovation it can help to have a plan; to start the planning :). The first step is to think about what it is driving the project.

Is it just the “something new” or is it motivated by a changing family need? Of course, if the cabinets and appliances are breaking down, it is probably a combination of things. You need a new kitchen, but you would also like it to work better and have an improved lay-out. If it is the hall bath that has the same lay-out, it is a new stuff and style issue. And lastly, if it is a major renovation and addition, then we need to spend time getting to the bottom of what life will have in store for at least the next decade.

Once you have zeroed in on the need or objective, it is time to interview. Right, I said interview! The interview process will help you discover what the right fit is for you and your family. Of course it is very important to like the person you hire but you also need to have confidence in their expertise and their ability to perform the work. As well as believe in the integrity of the firm.

You also have choices to make about the process that works for you. The structure of construction companies and the way they do business is almost endless. Most processes are based on 3 generic models:

1. The hire everything yourself approach. Here you could take a simple bath remodel, hire all the needed specialty subs and maybe even do the design work yourself. This process can get a quick upgrade to include a one person show that does some coordinating for you. The only pro to this method is cost saving since you will not have to pay someone to manage the project. The downside is that there are many cons if you are new to renovating. It isn’t like a repair you would hire a handy man for. Picking one sub-contractor at a time can lead to finger pointing and delays in the project.

2. The design-bid approach begins with hiring a designer or architect and then seeking companies to bid the project. Hiring a designer who has a good stable of contractors will help keep the process moving. The pros of this approach include having a design professional to work with you, getting a good understanding of the project scope during the interview stage with contractors and having some design oversight during construction. The cons are typically self- inflicted. Many homeowners want to fire the designer as soon as possible because of the cost, leaving a less design savvy person making many of those choices. Believing the plan is evenly understood or the scope will be followed by the contractor may make using the lower bid contract a poor decision. Without people to bid, it can take months to get pricing back from companies. This process also has a design/build tweak available by working with a separate design firm that has relationships to construction companies. This approach most common in the custom homes over $5m area.

3. The design build approach is of course the one I believe in most. So read the following knowing I have a difficult time being objective in this arena. There are companies that do design in house and even designers who act as a GC without any construction staff- a thought that appeals to me sometimes when I think of the challenge of hiring all the folks we need. A pure design build company has a full design department that can handle architecture, interior architecture as well as solid kitchen and bath work. Insert plug for Wiese Company here. The cons are needing to make some sort of initial investment in the project study and some light design work, and also making a very solid choice since this one firm will need to be responsible for the whole enchilada. The pros include one stop shopping, no finger pointing since the design/build firm has the onus of everything, and the involvement of the design team every step of the way. The modifications of this approach are scalable in how involved the designers are in the shopping process as well as how long the project will take and whether there is a designated project lead.

To answer the question about where our firm fits in, we are a full service operation. That means that we help our clients articulate the need and desire early. We use a full design process that includes a dedicated design professional to be the project coordinator from start to finish. They will catalogue and help with every selection (even personal shopping if needed) as well as provide the project with an administrator to help the owner and project lead. On the construction end, we put a lead carpenter in charge of the construction from beginning to end. They work closely with the client and designer while keeping the work on track and managing all the people and parts of the project while being hands on at the project daily.

Once you find the right person, they should help you go from there! Remember, if you don’t like the handy man, they are only in your home for an hour or 2 but when you embark on a major renovation, you’ll need to like someone past the honeymoon phase. Click here to contact us if you live in the area and are interested in using the design build approach.

Happy remodeling!

Pros and Cons of Waterfall Edges

Waterfall edges on counter tops can be a great way to push a modern vibe. As long as you know what to expect, you won’t be disappointed.

The first thing you should be prepared for is the cost, because in some cases this look can more than double the price. The things that have an effect on price start with the seam. Where the vertical and horizontal edges meet, the material should be grain matched to keep the movement in the top contiguous. You can see in the photos that this is true for both pictures. The picture with the double thick top is in our showroom and the waterfall edge is on both sides of the counter. On the other end (not shown) the grain does not line up because the material was not long enough. In the “during construction” photo for this high-rise kitchen remodel in Boston, we were able to procure a “jumbo” slab for seamless top and matching grains. Also, there is a price difference on the thickness of the counter and if you have it doubled up, you can achieve a finished side on both ends of the counter. Make sure you ask about the edge and get a look at the lay-out before you make a final decision.

 

 

Because this look is popular, driven both by the push for modern design and the desire to have a statement piece- don’t just put this look into a kitchen because you want one. When we are asked about incorporating a waterfall edge in a design, we try to also show 2-3 other concepts with other monolithic ideas to resolve what really works in the space. A great looking kitchen is the sum of the parts and if this is forced into a space it really doesn’t fit, it can actually detract from the end result.

It isn’t just for stone or quartz, we used a great piece of walnut in one kitchen that gave an additional stool space around the corner and made for a nice warm transition to the family room!

Happy counters! Ray