Remodeling and Renovation Planning- Where to Start

When preparing for a large renovation it can help to have a plan; to start the planning :). The first step is to think about what it is driving the project.

Is it just the “something new” or is it motivated by a changing family need? Of course, if the cabinets and appliances are breaking down, it is probably a combination of things. You need a new kitchen, but you would also like it to work better and have an improved lay-out. If it is the hall bath that has the same lay-out, it is a new stuff and style issue. And lastly, if it is a major renovation and addition, then we need to spend time getting to the bottom of what life will have in store for at least the next decade.

Once you have zeroed in on the need or objective, it is time to interview. Right, I said interview! The interview process will help you discover what the right fit is for you and your family. Of course it is very important to like the person you hire but you also need to have confidence in their expertise and their ability to perform the work. As well as believe in the integrity of the firm.

You also have choices to make about the process that works for you. The structure of construction companies and the way they do business is almost endless. Most processes are based on 3 generic models:

1. The hire everything yourself approach. Here you could take a simple bath remodel, hire all the needed specialty subs and maybe even do the design work yourself. This process can get a quick upgrade to include a one person show that does some coordinating for you. The only pro to this method is cost saving since you will not have to pay someone to manage the project. The downside is that there are many cons if you are new to renovating. It isn’t like a repair you would hire a handy man for. Picking one sub-contractor at a time can lead to finger pointing and delays in the project.

2. The design-bid approach begins with hiring a designer or architect and then seeking companies to bid the project. Hiring a designer who has a good stable of contractors will help keep the process moving. The pros of this approach include having a design professional to work with you, getting a good understanding of the project scope during the interview stage with contractors and having some design oversight during construction. The cons are typically self- inflicted. Many homeowners want to fire the designer as soon as possible because of the cost, leaving a less design savvy person making many of those choices. Believing the plan is evenly understood or the scope will be followed by the contractor may make using the lower bid contract a poor decision. Without people to bid, it can take months to get pricing back from companies. This process also has a design/build tweak available by working with a separate design firm that has relationships to construction companies. This approach most common in the custom homes over $5m area.

3. The design build approach is of course the one I believe in most. So read the following knowing I have a difficult time being objective in this arena. There are companies that do design in house and even designers who act as a GC without any construction staff- a thought that appeals to me sometimes when I think of the challenge of hiring all the folks we need. A pure design build company has a full design department that can handle architecture, interior architecture as well as solid kitchen and bath work. Insert plug for Wiese Company here. The cons are needing to make some sort of initial investment in the project study and some light design work, and also making a very solid choice since this one firm will need to be responsible for the whole enchilada. The pros include one stop shopping, no finger pointing since the design/build firm has the onus of everything, and the involvement of the design team every step of the way. The modifications of this approach are scalable in how involved the designers are in the shopping process as well as how long the project will take and whether there is a designated project lead.

To answer the question about where our firm fits in, we are a full service operation. That means that we help our clients articulate the need and desire early. We use a full design process that includes a dedicated design professional to be the project coordinator from start to finish. They will catalogue and help with every selection (even personal shopping if needed) as well as provide the project with an administrator to help the owner and project lead. On the construction end, we put a lead carpenter in charge of the construction from beginning to end. They work closely with the client and designer while keeping the work on track and managing all the people and parts of the project while being hands on at the project daily.

Once you find the right person, they should help you go from there! Remember, if you don’t like the handy man, they are only in your home for an hour or 2 but when you embark on a major renovation, you’ll need to like someone past the honeymoon phase. Click here to contact us if you live in the area and are interested in using the design build approach.

Happy remodeling!

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